How to Avoid a Climate Catastrophe

We need nothing short of a ‘green revolution’ to avoid a climate catastrophe, and a global green revolution at that. A green revolution in terms of political focus and infrastructure but also a green revolution in terms of our everyday behaviour as consumers and the choices we make in our everyday lives. We, the public, are the key and we must be the catalyst for change. But how do we mobilise the public at large? How do we promote deeper levels of change in attitudes and behaviour? What’s been missing so far?

At this interactive talk event, Dr Laura McGuire and Prof Geoff Beattie will discuss and demonstrate their psychological approach to this most pressing of problems and encourage attendees to try out their tests and measures*. Come and participate yourself in the science of climate action behaviour in this unique and different Festival event!

*Attendees will have the opportunity to try out the Implicit Association Test, a well-established technique that they have used in their research on the psychology of climate change. They will also demonstrate the eye-tracker and discuss how implicit attitudes relate to unconscious eye movements and why this is critical to climate change.

Laura McGuire staff profile photo

Dr. Laura McGuire is a lecturer in Psychology at Edge Hill University. Her main research interest is in understanding the role of education in shaping our values, attitudes and behaviour in the area of climate change. She is currently evaluating the effectiveness of different kinds of educational initiatives, including the creative arts, for attitude change and for climate change mitigation behaviour. Her academic research combines her long-standing interest in drama with her interest and expertise in experimental social psychology.

Professor Geoffrey Beattie is a psychologist, author and broadcaster. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge and is now Professor of Psychology at Edge Hill University. Research interests include multi-modal communication and the psychological barriers to climate change mitigation. He was awarded the Spearman Medal by the British Psychological Society (B.P.S.) for ‘published psychological research of outstanding merit’ and the Mouton d’Or for his outstanding work in semiotics. He is a Fellow of both the B.P.S. and the Royal Society of Arts, and the author of 26 books, several of which have either won or been shortlisted for major national and international prizes.

TIME: 1:00pm – 3:00pm, Wednesday 3rd November
LOCATION: Law & Psychology Room LP0.29
No need to book just turn up